Post Processing…

Do you edit your images? I get that questions a lot and the answer is a very simple, yes.

Desk

Now I am not talking about changing out the sky or adding a dinosaur to the foreground. What I do in post-processing would be considered more as adjustments in my view. The reason is not to make the image look more impressive or different, but to make it look more like the scene and composition looked to me when I pressed the shutter release. That raises the question “why doesn’t the image look the way it did when you took it”?

There are a few reasons for this. First would be that I shoot everything in a RAW format. Raw files are named so because they are not yet processed and therefore are not ready to be printed or edited. These files capture and contain much more information and detail from the scene than you would get from a Jpeg image, which is great. The downside of shooting RAW is the images look somewhat drab and flat straight out of the camera.

Lightroom

Another reason is the dynamic range of the images I normally shoot is greater than can be processed straight to a JPeg image, it is just way too much information to be stored in that format. Bit, all that extra detail in the RAW files can be pulled out by processing the image. I use Adobe Lightroom for 85% post-processing, and by making a few simple adjustments to the image, the dark shadows are brightened to reveal detail that you couldn’t see, and the highlights are muted to allow the blown out areas of the image to be tamed and more impressive.

Adjustments

Once I have pulled images into Adobe Lightroom, the first few adjustments I make are pretty much the same for all my landscape shots and though they are very slight, they have a pretty big image on the overall look of the image.

  • Contrast
  • Highlights
  • Shadow
  • Clarity
  • Vibrancy

I don’t have a standard amount for each adjustment, it is all done by eye to get the visual impact of the image to be as close to what the scene was when the image was taken. These are just the normal adjustments I make, and depending on the image I will make other changes as needed to the Whites and Blacks of the image, Exposure, and Sharpness.

Something I try not to adjust that often, and when I do, it is very slightly, is the color saturation of the image. Instead, I use the color Vibrancy adjustment. The difference between the two is that the vibrancy raises or lowers the primary color of the image, for this image it most affected the greens. Color Saturation, on the other hand, affects the level of every color in the image, and it is really easy to get carried away.

Mission Hills Ranch-43-Edit-Edit-Edit

Adjusting the saturation of an image can really help and I don’t want to give the impression that I don’t ever use it, this image has a very slight saturation boost as a matter of fact. That being said, I think oversaturating images is something that a lot of photographers go to in an effort to elevate the impact of the image, and there are many that take it too far. So, I would suggest having a light hand when adjusting the saturation, but that is just my opinion.

Two other adjustments that I use but try to keep at a minimum are the Clarity slider and the Sharpness. Both can have a pretty dramatic effect on the image but can be taken too far pretty easily. Adjusting the Clarity can soften the image giving an ethereal look, or it can add a gritty harshness to the shot, which can lend well to some styles.

Screen Shot 2018-08-11 at 7.39.26 PMSharpness is very important to most images, and having a slider seems like an easy way to raise the level of the detail. The downside of using the sharpness adjustment is that the more you add, the more grain or pixelation there is to the image, and this can really cause a messy look to the image if you are printing it. When I am adjusting the sharpness of the image, I will always use the Masking feature along with it. This allows the adjustment to be applied to specific areas of the image rather than the entire image in a blanketed fashion. So, rather than an entire blade of grass, just the edges.

In addition to making adjustments in Adobe Lightroom, I do also use Adobe Photoshop for other editings, like removing, people, trash, powerlines or just clutter from the image that I would rather not be there. Photoshop does an awesome job at this and it is a very easy step in my workflow when finishing the image.

So to answer the question again, absolutely I edit my images. It is an important part of the process of landscape photography and like I said earlier, the majority of the images you see on Instagram, Facebook, and other sites have been edited in some form or fashion. As a photographer in the digital world, post-processing technics are something that I spend a lot of time practicing and expanding on, the same way I do with new photo technics.

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